The culture of ellipsis

The culture of ellipsis means you don’t finish what you want to say, it means instead of putting a verb in your sentence, you leave the reader up in the air.

The culture of ellipsis means you don’t speak your mind, that you don’t deliver your words, and that you assume yourself to be shrewd for doing so.

The culture of ellipsis is to quit; to surrender the space you are expected to fill, and to fail to shoulder the responsibility for your own ideas.

The culture of ellipsis is limited neither to rhetoric, nor to three dots. Take this obsession with the use of metaphor and allusion – the venue that has enabled our thinkers and literate to survive the autocracy-stricken history of ours, and has now become our disposition it seems. Such obsession is a type of ellipsis on its own right, as it hinders the plain speech and clear mind, sending the reader off track, in search of meaninglessness.

Ellipsis is not the same as silence; rather it is the art of wrapping the words in a web of ambiguities while those eager to listen and learn are in full attendance.

The culture of ellipsis is to speak in twisted words to friends and foes alike, either to tease or to quiz. The culture of ellipsis, in short is to be expectant, but not to be transparent.



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