Shrimp-beans-quinoa with nasturtium

I am making the most of our short summer here in Montreal , making good use of my edible flowers grown in my beloved patio. Here is an idea if you fancy nasturtium in your shrimp dish as a beautiful summer side dish.

Ingredients (serves 4-6 as a side dish)

  •  350 gr. shrimps, peeled, deveined and briefly boiled
  • 1 cup quinoa (white or mixed – your choice)
  • ½ cup black beans, cooked with a pinch of salt
  • 1 tbsp. fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1tbsp. fresh chives or garlic greens, chopped
  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 lime or lemon to be cut for garnish
  • A few nasturtiums or any other edible flower you might have around your yard or balcony
  • 2 tbsp. cooking oil
  • Salt, black pepper, and fresh lemon or lime juice as required

Method:

Rinse quinoa in small pot. Add equal part (1 cup) water and a pinch of salt and 1 tbsp. cooking oil and cook over medium heat with closed lid until it is cooked through but not mashed.  Drain and transfer to a serving dish. Mix the cooked quinoa with chopped parsley.  

In a frying pan, heat 1 tbsp. cooking oil and sauté the chopped onions.  Once translucent, add chopped garlic and fry for 1 more minutes.  Add shrimps and continue frying for a few minutes. Turn the heat off. Toss in black beans and mix well then transfer to the serving dish on top of the quinoa. Use a fork to gently stir and mix the content. It’s okay if the major bulk of quinoa stays underneath.  

Mix together salt, pepper and 1-2 tbsp. lime juice and season the dish. Finally garnish with lime cuts, chives and your freshly picked flower and share with loved ones!  Enjoy!

 

 

 


Celery Root, Green Apple and Pistachio Salad

This is an extremely easy, tasty and summery salad with lots of room for creativity! I serve this as a side when I have a small party: I also enjoy having it on hot summer days as a light lunch. 

Ingredients (serving 3-4 for a salad or side) Read the rest of this entry »


Loaf cake, with raisins and walnuts

A classic loaf cake is by far my favorite type of cake nice for breakfast, afternoon tea and easy to bake. I realize there are so many varieties out there but this one – with raisins and walnuts – is an extremely good combination and my recipe here makes a light and fluffy cake. I have tried a gluten-free version of this cake by replacing the regular flour with Bob’s Red Mill gluten free all-purpose flour. The cake did not get as fluffy but everything else was just about perfect! 

Ingredients Read the rest of this entry »


Spicy Pan Kebab, kabab tabeh کباب تابه 

Living in the minus double digits for a few months by this time of the year, I miss so many things including my charcoal burning barbecue and all the goodies that get roasted and cooked on it during the summer evenings in company of good friends and lots of cool drinks!  I specially miss our kebab making rituals around it although to tell the truth my family eats red meat now, only once in two weeks or so.

If, like me, you crave kebab koobideh, and are ready to settle for a pot version of it, this post is for you.  The basic idea is the same as in original koobideh, only we spread the big meatball instead of dividing it into small balls and then skewering them. This means you will not need to worry about kebab holding on to the skewers while being roasted which means, in turn, we can play around with the ingredients.  You will note that in my new recipe for Pan kebab koobideh below, I have added lots of spices in addition to the grated tomatoes and garlic to the ground beef.  I believe with this kebab what lacks in ambiance, it definitely makes up in the taste! Read the rest of this entry »


Pomegranate soup, Aash-e anar, for Yalda

Once again Yalda, one of Iranian’s much loved and cherished celestial moments and rituals is round the corner. We celebrate Yalda on winter solstice on Dec. 20th  as the longest and darkest night of the year by getting together, reciting poetry and feasting over a colorful spread of dried fruits and nuts, aajil, specific fruits namely pomegranate, persimmon and watermelon, cozy heartwarming dishes and lots of light, hope and energy to get through the long but increasingly brighter winter ahead. See my precious posts for Yalda night here and here.

The Persian “Pomegranate Soup” or ash-e anar آش انار, will forever resonate with me the excellent culinary fiction by the same name written by Marsha Mehran, an eloquent Iranian-Irish author who passed too soon but whose novels depicted Persian cuisine enchanting as a fairy-tale full of texture, fragrance and mystery always ready to haut, charm and welcome those unfamiliar with it. Read the rest of this entry »


Aash Sabzi Shirazi (herb aash)

My non Iranian friends may already be familiar with Persian aash, especially from my post on Aash-e reshteh.  Nevertheless, I am going to take you through some fun introductory notes on aash in general and aash sabzi Shirazi آش سبزی شیرازی in particular, using experts from e-book, A sip, A bite, A mouthful: A memoir of food & rowing up in Shiraz.  

As reluctant as I am to use the term “soup” to describe aash, for fear of undermining its significant position within Iranian cuisine and culture, I nevertheless find a comparison between the two the most efficient way to describe the dish to new appetites.  To this end, aash could be said to be an “honorable soup”–rich, thick and laborious to prepare. Depending on the type of aash, it is made of specific varieties of herbs, vegetables, fruits, grains and dairy products; with or without beef or lamb. Read the rest of this entry »


Sum of Summer in My Garden