Sum of Summer in My Garden


Almond cookies: 3 ingredients, gluten free

This super easy and super fast cookie is …well, super Yummy!  No butter or oil is required not even to grease the baking sheet.  Yet the cookies are crisp chewy, a bit heavy yet tender  – and with my recipe not too sweet either.  I love them with my evening tea and sometimes with my morning coffee.

Ingredients

  • 1 egg
  • 2 cups almond flour blanched
  • ½ cup raw cane sugar
  • 15 raw whole almonds to top the cookie (optional)

Method:

Preheat the oven to 300 F

In a medium bowl, whisk the egg and cane sugar using your hand mixer’s one beater for 1-2 minutes.

Slowly add in the almond flour while continuing to blend the mix.  When the dough gets too thick to move by the electric mixer, clean the beater off the dough and fold with your hands if necessary to get homogenous – and very sticky – dough.

Take ping-pong-size balls off the main dough until you have 15 almost equal size dough balls.

Flatten each small ball on the palm of your hand and place it on the prepared lined baking sheet. Leave at least 1 inch space between the balls.  There is no need to grease the sheet as almond flour’s natural oil is released by heat, preventing the cookies from sticking to the baking sheet.

If desired, place one whole almond at the center of each cookie and gently press.

Bake in the preheated oven for 15 to 20 minutes until set in the center and golden brown at the bottom.  Feel free to peek in for inspection by opening the oven’s door; it would not damage the baking process as it would in case of baking a cake for example.

Remove from the oven and place on a counter for 10 minutes, then transfer cookies to a cooling rack until they are completely cool.

Keep cookies in an air tight container, layered with baking sheets for 2-3 days.  And make them in small batches so that they are always fresh.

Enjoy!


Pomegranate Faloodeh: Persian iced dessert

Recently, on a hot humid days in Montreal, I was privileged to entertain a large group of my family with good food, scented shades on the porch, open heart, and most impressive of all, with homemade faloodeh  Shirazi (pomegranate faloodeh in this case).

Faloodeh or paloodeh فالوده، پالوده is a refreshing iced dessert, a summer savoury, made of frozen cornstarch, water, sugar and rosewater.  Like Salad Shirazi, Faloodeh Shiraz is a speciality of my old hometown Shiraz.  The dessert is of course popular nationwide and is almost always made from the scratch in ice-cream stores and sold in small washable or disposable cups. In Shiarz alone faloodeh is enjoyed with few drops of either flower syrup or lime juice sprinkled on it; everywhere else people eat it with or without lime juice. Read the rest of this entry »


Persian Stuffed Meatballs: Koofteh Tabrizi

You might remember at least two types of meatballs I have described here: One in an older post for cabbage mixed rice , where we make very small meatballs, and the other one in a dish I called Koofteh  and served with vegetables.

Today I want to share with you a very popular dish called Koofteh Tabrizi کوفته تبریزی – a rich yet tender meatball served in savoury thick tomato broth.  As the name suggests the dish is a speciality of the city of Tabriz also known for its sophisticated and extremely delicious cuisine. Like the other two meatballs, the basis of Koofteh Tabrizi is a mix of ground meat, grated onions, chickpea flour, turmeric and pepper-salt.  However, Koofteh Tabrizi is distinct in its taste as it is mixed with cooked rice and split peas as well as with aromatic fresh herbs; it is also different from other types of meatballs with regard to its fairly large size (here we go with Tennis ball size in order to better manage and make sure it will hold throughout the cooking process). Read the rest of this entry »


Chia-Berries drink

Give me a cool glass of Chia-berries mix any day of the year and I will gladly take 40 plus centigrade – like we have had in the past few days in Montreal! This is truly the ultimate summer drink – refreshing, nutritious, savory, pretty even and easy to make.

Ingredients (4-5 serving) Read the rest of this entry »


Spring Flowers

Spring was late in Montreal this year but it finally got here – in full glory!

I am blessed with two old lilac trees on two sides of my backyard: one right next to my kitchen’s window and the other arching over our newly built deck. The heavenly omnipresent fragrance of my lilac flowers make May the happiest and calmest month of the year for me.

Read the rest of this entry »


Norooz eggs: Painting with vegetables & fruits

Only five days left till the Persian new year, Norooz, celebrated by some 187 million people across the globe on the first day of spring, this year on March 20th. And right now,  in every Iranian’s household at least one person is quite busy (you know who that person is, right) – from shopping new cloths, to cleaning house to preparing haftsin table, tending to sabzeh and of course painting hard boiled eggs.  Watch my brief video clips here here for a colorful introduction of Norooz celebration and here for a “very fast” preparation of Norooz table! Don’t forget to check out the links below for Norooz-special blogs by my friends at #PersianFoodBloggers.

From ancient time, dyeing and decorating eggs has been a significant symbol in many cultures around the world – from the Zoroastrian Norooz dating back to over 3000 years ago, to the Jewish Passover to the Christian Easter, eggs are painted in solid or multicolored often to symbolize rebirth. In my youth time, my older sisters used to dye Norooz eggs by wrapping them in color bleeding pieces of brightly colored cloths, tightly sewing them in and hard boiling them in salted water.  The cooled eggs would then emerge from the wet cloths delicately colored and patterned. In my household too, we usually take the egg painting quite seriously, often going to some length to actually paint the eggs in detailed and complicated designs. Watch some of those here.  Read the rest of this entry »