Persian Rosette, “naan panjareh-i”

Do you know the deep fried cookie called Rosette which is made during Christmas time? Well, in Iran, we make a quite similar type of cookies during the Persian New year, Norooz.

Makes one wonder about the association, hummm…  Ours, when translated literally means “Window Bread”.  It is the first cookie I learned to make in a high school course when I was 14. Still following the same recipe.

Read the rest of this entry »


Fried fish & cranberries

This colorful fish dish is improvised by my sister and besides tasting deliciously sour, helps lift your spirit, especially when accompanied by spinach-avocado-grapefruit salad (see picture below).

Ingredients (serving 2) Read the rest of this entry »


Split-beans stew, “khoresh-e ghaymeh”

In Persian, we have a proverb that compares the “sacrificial lamb” to the benevolent scapegoat- both victims in happy and sad times.

Well, split-beans stew (khoresh-e ghaymeh) brings to mind that proverb, as it is traditionally made and served at both weddings and funerals.  No upcoming wedding or funerals planned, yet I have got to share this as one of my favorite  stews.

Ingredients (serves 5-6) Read the rest of this entry »


Grated cucumber & yogurt (Maast-O-Khiyar)

Maast-O-khiyar: Grated cucumber and yogurt, mixed with salt, black pepper and dried mint powder, and topped with dried rose powder: a perfect combination of tastes, aroma and color and a savory companion of many Persian foods.


Pumpkin Stew

Have you got lots of pumpkins sitting around? I have got a solution!  Add this delicious meal to the list of your Halloween season dishes! It is a unique Persian dish particular to the southern province of Bushehr, called khoresh-e kadoo savaaheli.

Ingredients (serving 3):

Read the rest of this entry »


Lentil soup and meat, blended

Remember I mention how healthy lentil is and how much use we have for lentil in Persian cuisine? HereWell, with the fall already settled in, this delicious and nutritious lentil soup is all I felt having this weekend.  I know lentil vegetable soup is probably one of the most diverse soup verities, yet this blended version with meat broth is different in many ways. You’ll see what I mean.

Ingredients:

  • Veal, or beef, 150 gr. defatted.
  • Bone, 1 medium.
  • Brown lentil, 200 gr.
  • Onion, 1 large, thinly sliced.
  • Turmeric, ½ tea spoon.
  • salt and black powder pepper, to taste.
  • Water, 1 ½ liters.
  • Oil, 1 tbsp.
  • Whipping cream, 2 tbsp.
  • Chopped parsley, 2 tbsp.

Method: In a medium pot sauté onions in hot oil. Add meat and bone and turmeric and fry for a few more minutes over medium heat, just as you would for any type of Iranian style stew. Add salt, pepper and six cups of water (bout 1 ½ liters). Cook covered, for about 45 minutes.  Remove the bone from the broth and let it cool; Extract the bone marrow and pick the meat off the bone, if any, and transfer them back to the pot.  Rinse lentil and add it to the broth and cook until tender.

Blend the pot’s contents, in two or more steps if necessary, until smooth. Pour it back to the pot and simmer for another 10 minutes, just in case you need to adjust the soup’s thickness (either by adding more warm water, or by letting it simmer to thicken a bit).

Once the look is to your liking, pour into a serving bowl and garnish with a sprinkling of whipping cream and chopped parsley.


Kookoo sabzi, the many faces of it!

Do you remember my version of kookoo sabzi, or herb-omelette? Here it is if you don’t.

There are many versions, of course- and this video and article posted at Radio Free Europe and the references that the article makes are among my favorites. Read the rest of this entry »