Dill/beans mixed-polow with fish

I can eat this mix-polow as a complete main dish, but it is very common to have it with fried fish in the southern part of Iran. It might also be served with large chunks of boiled or baked beef or even fried and steam-cooked chicken.

  • Ingredients (serving 3)

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Shrimp-Onion dish

This is another exciting southern Iran speciality, provoking a lot of “home” memories. It is eaten with bread, which means it is usually prepared for supper, but no written rule about it. It is nutritious, delicious, gorgeous and very easy and fast to prepare.


Kebab koobideh

Kebab Koobideh is probably the most renowned Iranian dish and certainly one of the most popular ones both on tables and in Persian cooking sites. Like kebab barg, koobideh is a restaurant dish; however it is more commonly made at home. Why? I really don’t know because to me barg is less tricky and more difficult to spoil. Ok, let’s get started and I’ll explain what I mean:

 


Celery stew

This is one of the few khoreshes without tomatoes! At least this version of it.  Two more things: My experiment with making traditional Iranian stews without meat (in fact, by replacing meat with some sort of beans) has been very successful.

 

However, celery stew (khoresh karafs) is one of the few, in my opinion, that won’t turn great without meat. And it absolutely must accompany plain rice!

Ingredients(serving 4-5 ) Read the rest of this entry »


Red-lentil stew, vegetarian with tamarind

Daal adas is one of the rare meatless Iranian stew and is very popular in South and South-west Iran  (Bushehr, Hormozgan and khuzestan provinces), where food is generally more spicy than other parts of the country.

Like any given khoresh or dish, daal adas is prepared in different ways in various households. The way my Bushehri mom used to cook it, often when she was in hurry, is the one I came to like and learn.

Ingredients: (serving 4-5):

  • Red lintel, 2 cups.
  • Onion, 1 medium, thinly sliced.
  • Potato, 1 medium, skinned and cut in four pieces.
  • Garlic cloves (ideally green or fresh) 3-4 cloves, finely minced.
  • Tomato sauce 1/2 tbsp. (or one cup of V8).
  • Tamarind sauce, 3 tbsp (see note and picture below).
  • Turmeric, ½ tbs.
  • Powdered red pepper, 1/4 tbsp.
  • Salt, to the taste.
  • Cooking oil, 5 tbsp.
  • Water, 4 cups, or 3 cups if you are using V8

Note: I buy fresh tamarind from Middle Eastern stores; they taste wonderful (more sour than sweet) and are very rich. For this recipe, I use one long pod, skin and soak it in 2-3 tbsp of hot water. After 15 minutes, I just squeeze the pod and use the extracted juice for my daal stew.

Method: Wash the red lentils in cold water by raking with fingers and rinsing until the water runs clear. In a pot, add lentil, potatoes, water/V8, , and salt. Bring to boil and turn to medium heat and cook for half an hour or until the potatoes are soft. With the back of a spoon smash the potatoes against the pot and turn off the heat.

While your lentil is cooking prepare your piaz daagh: That is, in a frying pan sauté onions in hot oil until slightly golden. Stir frequently. Add garlic and sauté just long enough to release the scent. Be careful not to burn them or let them turn brownish because black spots would not look nice in the stew. Add turmeric and red pepper and mix well for two more minutes while still frying. Add fried onion and garlic, as well as the tomato’s paste (if you did not use V8) and tamarind sauce to the pot. Simmer for 5 minutes until you get a homogeneous thick soup. Taste for adjustment. It is ready to be served, with plain rice, of course!

 


Cabbage-mixed polow

This is one of the most gorgeous looking and aromatic Persian mixed polows, requiring extra time and effort, but absolutely rewarding when prepared in authentic (Shirazi) way.

 

Ingredients (serving 4-6):

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Eggplant stew or khoresh-e bademjaan

General Note: (this seems an old note, but it is not!) Whether for lunch or dinner, one of the most mainstream Iranian main dishes consists of rice – plain, white chelow, or mixed polow— and a meat stew (khoresh). Now…, chelow must always accompany khoresh, while polow, layered with cooked or fried grains, vegetables, prunes, fruits or meat forms a complete dish.

Like mixed polow, Khoresh comes in tens of various tastes, colours and aromas, although they are all started in the same way and follow the same pattern: That is, lamb, beef, veal or chicken is used as the stew base (1), using four ever present ingredients: cooking oil, fried onion or piaz daagh, turmeric and all spice or advieh ( 2). The differentiating element of khoreshes is the specific set of vegetables, fruits, grains, and prunes that are added to them – often after being friend separately (3). I will tag all khoreshes, as I post them here. Let’s start with one of the most popular one: chicken and eggplants stew (khoresh-e joojeh bademjaan)

Ingredients

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Ground beef mixed polow

General Note: Whether as lunch or dinner, one of the most mainstream Iranian main dishes consists of rice – plain, white chelow, or mixed polow— and a meat stew (khoresh). Now…, chelow must always accompany khoresh, while polow, layered with cooked or fried grains, vegetables, prunes, fruits or meat forms a complete dish as long as it is accompanied by side-dishes such as fresh herbs and salads. Mixed polow comes in tens of varieties, some more standard than the others. I will tag them all, as I post them here. To start, here is one of the less mainstream ones: ground beef mixed polow

Ingredients: Rice, 3 cups. Ground veal or beef, 300 gr. Potato, 1 medium. Onion,1  big. Powder dried lime, 1 full tbs. turmeric half tbs. cooking oil, 2 tbs. A pinch of saffron. Salt and black pepper as needed.

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Aab-goosht

Ab-ghoosht, the most traditional Iranian “soup”, for the lack of a better word, is a rich spicy stew of meat and beans and pretty easy to cook.

Ingredients (serving five):

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Kebab barg

As a rule, kebab barg is served in restaurants (inside and outside Iran), yet I have figured out how to prepare and barbeque it at home and promise it tastes just as tender and delicious.

Buy a whole tenderloin (filet mignon), and after cleaning it up briefly slice it in cross-sections. The width of each slice should be almost equal to the width of barg kebab, or twice the width of skewer. Read the rest of this entry »