Kale Chips

I was so excited when I first discovered the “massaged kale salad” and shred it here.

More excited still with my recent discovery of Kale chips. I followed Kate Eats Real Food’s recipe here and came up with an excellent – crispy and de-li-cious chips kale chips!!


Vegan stew, one type, three rules

Vegetarian, and vegan, stew-like dishes are healthy, easy and quick. Most important of all, when it comes to following a vegi recipe or inventing your own, sky is the limit!   Having said that, there are certain “rules” I always follow to in order to come up with a delicious AND pretty looking vegetable-based dish.

  1. Use at least one type of grains to supplement meat/protean.
  2. Use potatoes or one type of pasta to make the dish thick and filling
  3. Consider the cooking time of the vegetables being used and add each one to the main pot appropriatly. Mixing everything together at the same time will certainly destroy the look of the dish

Read the rest of this entry »


Lentil-rice mix

This is another popular and hearty “mixed polow” usually served with fried or roasted chicken (or ground beef) and considered a casual and convenient dish. Well, I make it in a quite presentable (read fancy) way, without any kind of. Even before I realized how protein rich and nutritious lentil was, I always thought the dish is a perfect vegetarian meal and found it quite hearty on its own. So, my version of “adas polow” is meatless yet simply fancy!

Ingredients (serving 4): Rice, 3 cups. Green lentil” 1 ½ . Onion, 1 big, thinly sliced. Dried seedless raisin ½ cup, washed and dried. Oil: 4-5 tbsp. Turmeric, ¼ tbsp. Ground saffron, 2 teaspoon (1 soaked in 1 tbsp. of hot water for half an hour) salt, pepper and water as needed. Read the rest of this entry »


Red-lentil stew, vegetarian with tamarind

Daal adas is one of the rare meatless Iranian stew and is very popular in South and South-west Iran  (Bushehr, Hormozgan and khuzestan provinces), where food is generally more spicy than other parts of the country.

Like any given khoresh or dish, daal adas is prepared in different ways in various households. The way my Bushehri mom used to cook it, often when she was in hurry, is the one I came to like and learn.

Ingredients: (serving 4-5):

  • Red lintel, 2 cups.
  • Onion, 1 medium, thinly sliced.
  • Potato, 1 medium, skinned and cut in four pieces.
  • Garlic cloves (ideally green or fresh) 3-4 cloves, finely minced.
  • Tomato sauce 1/2 tbsp. (or one cup of V8).
  • Tamarind sauce, 3 tbsp (see note and picture below).
  • Turmeric, ½ tbs.
  • Powdered red pepper, 1/4 tbsp.
  • Salt, to the taste.
  • Cooking oil, 5 tbsp.
  • Water, 4 cups, or 3 cups if you are using V8

Note: I buy fresh tamarind from Middle Eastern stores; they taste wonderful (more sour than sweet) and are very rich. For this recipe, I use one long pod, skin and soak it in 2-3 tbsp of hot water. After 15 minutes, I just squeeze the pod and use the extracted juice for my daal stew.

Method: Wash the red lentils in cold water by raking with fingers and rinsing until the water runs clear. In a pot, add lentil, potatoes, water/V8, , and salt. Bring to boil and turn to medium heat and cook for half an hour or until the potatoes are soft. With the back of a spoon smash the potatoes against the pot and turn off the heat.

While your lentil is cooking prepare your piaz daagh: That is, in a frying pan sauté onions in hot oil until slightly golden. Stir frequently. Add garlic and sauté just long enough to release the scent. Be careful not to burn them or let them turn brownish because black spots would not look nice in the stew. Add turmeric and red pepper and mix well for two more minutes while still frying. Add fried onion and garlic, as well as the tomato’s paste (if you did not use V8) and tamarind sauce to the pot. Simmer for 5 minutes until you get a homogeneous thick soup. Taste for adjustment. It is ready to be served, with plain rice, of course!

 


Roman-beans dish, for the love of the good old days

 

This is a side dish and a favorite chaser or mazeh among many Iranians; it goes particularly well with the Iranian hard liquor, aragh. A mazeh should be spicy and delicious of course, and should ideally contain a lot of protein. Charcoal-grilled lamb’s liver (jegar) for instance is another renowned mazeh. In Iran, Kidney beans dish is by tradition prepared and sold by restaurant, bars (when we had them) and street venders. However, khoraak looia is very easy to prepare at home; it is nutritious, tasty and always good to have as a side dish, or even on its own.

Ingredients: Read the rest of this entry »


Salads, for the love of a pretty table

Never underestimate the power of a refreshing and gorgeous-looking bowl of salad, even of the simplest type; it adds color to your table, flavor to your main dish, and admiration towards your taste

No. 1 : Cabbage-Noodle Salad. Grate the carrot and chop the cabbage. Still fry sliced almond briefly (w/o oil) and mix with cabbage-carrot. Top with dried rice noodle. The dressing (salt and rice vinegar) should go just before serving else it soften and noodles Read the rest of this entry »


Jewel-mixed rice

Jewel-mixed polo or ‘morasa polo” is a dish I often make when I want to impress my visitor :), of course served with fried or oven-cooked chicken. It has a unique taste – a bit sweet with the dominant taste of sweetened orange peel.  In all fairness, this is quite a complex recipe to start my Persian cooking list with but I love the color so I went for it assuming many of you know the basics. If not, nothing to worry about. I will explain how to prepare plain rice in a separate post shortly.

Ingredients (serving five) Read the rest of this entry »